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Males. Morals and Majorities - interview with Gloria Steinam

changeful as they are in Europe. In the late 60s when I first became aware of feminism, and light bulbs began to go off in my head, by and large women who had described themselvesDid your adoption of feminism prompt you to feel that feminism was very raw and was going to have to develop for itselfwomen. It has been a terrible struggle of the women of the Left to produce their own feminism. Yes. Nonetheless there's something that disturbs me very much and I don't know what
Marxism Today June 1984

SUPERGIRL

SUPERGIRL Tessa Perkins That the mass media has found it necessary and profitable to take account of feminism has been evident for several years now. Although this can be seen in a wide varietychildren; or do they somehow manage to reinforce the status quo by robbing feminism of its guts. It is important to recognise that even though all the examples listed above arealmost because although as far as the film's narrative is concerned the suppression of feminism is total, the film nonetheless offers women a pleasure which comes close to being subversive. In order
Marxism Today October 1984

Women: not what they bargained for

little to the political dark ages in which we now find ourselves. For too long feminism has found itself on the margins of socialist politics, critical, powerless and excluded, claiming special needs, treatedspecial problem. Feminism does have something to say, however, which strikes deep at the heart of what class struggle is about. This article is concerned with our recent political history, and future political strategyFeminist Economics, Feminist Review No 6, 1980. J Heidi Hartmann, 'The Unhappy Marriage of Marxism and Feminism, in Capital and Class No. 81979. "Hilary Land, 'The Mantle of Manhood', New Statesman, 18/25 December, 1981. * Catherine
Marxism Today March 1982

LIFE

created in 1970, were reformist and legalist. I never had any desire to join them. The new feminism is, on the contrary, radical. It has adopted the slogans of 1968: — change everyday lifeinferior that those who struggle for equality are rare. There are many misunderstandings about the term feminism. I ’d like you to give me your definition. At the end of the Second Sex I saidposition o f women, but that radical in the years to come. It interests me a feminism, which questions society and the existing relationships between men lot. But I think the analyses which make
7 Days Wednesday March 8, 1972 No 19

Sen for Americans?

book's weakness; the analysis is burdened with the cumbersome and unwieldy analytic preconceptions of an unreconstructed feminism, and this sometimes blunts some of its sharper insights and political instincts. Having said that, it shouldthat Faludi manages to convey some of the passion and energy that fuelled the earlier ambitions of feminism; she thus provides a reminder that, crude as the truths expressed by social movements are, they havesense this composite project succeeds - certainly it cannot simply be dismissed on the grounds of its unreconstructed feminism, or inattention to historical resonance. But her project is flawed because not only does she bury class
Soundings soundings issue 14 Spring 2000

What is 'transversal politics'?

2. Donna Haraway, 'Situated knowledge: The science question in feminism and the privilege of partial perspective', Feminist .Studies 14(3), 1988. 3. See Louis Dumont, Homo HierarchiesJan Pettman, Living in the margins, racism, sexism and feminism in Australia, Allen & Unwin, Sydney 1992, p157. 5. Alison Assiter, Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodernschematic. I have elaborated more on the concept in my article 'Women, ethnicity and empowerment, in Feminism and Psychology, special issue, Shifting identities, shifting racisms, edited by K. Bhavnani and A Phoenix
Soundings soundings issue 12 summer 1999

Jonathan Rutherford

significant political and cultural gap between generations. The politics of Marxism Today, the legacies of libertarian socialism, feminism and Gramsci appear to have made little impact on today's young. Young people are not usingsucceed at school, in Education Today and Tomorrow, Vol 49 Nol Spring 1997, and in Black British Feminism, Heidi Safia Mirza (ed), Routledge, London 1997. 117uncertainties of the 1990s. Young behaviour' women appear to have a greater social confidence. The legacy of feminism has been a transformation in their attitudes and aspirations. In contrast to young women's ambition
Soundings soundings issue 6 Summer 1997

Lay Down Your Weary Tune; The Left And The Cultural Politics Of Aids

prominent in AIDS activism like Cindy Patton, Tony Whitehead, and Jonathan Grimshaw jostle with names prominent in feminism and cultural theory - Lynne Segal, Judith Williamson, and Jeffrey Weeks among others. The effect of thisconstruct is a cultural politics of AIDS rooted in community activism, theoretically informed by cultural theory and feminism, with ambitions to recruit in and resonate with common sense. In other words, a cultural politics aimingcultural politics of AIDS stands at the intersection of many different histories - of medicine, gay liberation, feminism, the pharmaceutical industry, the press, the criminalization of injecting drug use, racism
New Formations Number 10 Spring 1990

Aesthetic Autonomy And The Crisis Of Theory: Greenberg, Adorno, And The Problem Of Postmodernism In The Visual Arts

semiology of painting', Enclitic, III, 1 (Spring 1979). 22 Roszika Parker and Griselda Pollock (eds), Framing Feminism: Art and the Women's Movement 1970-1985 (London: Pandora Press, 1987); and, for the American scene, LucyLippard, From the Centre: Feminist essays on women's art (New York: Dutton, 1976). Lippard argues that 'Feminism's greatest contribution to the future vitality of art has probably been precisely its lack of contributionModernism' ('Sweeping exchanges: the contribution of feminism to the art of the seventies', Art Journal, 41, 1/2 (1980), 362 - quoted by Griselda Pollock, 'Feminism and modernism', in Parker and Pollock, op. cit., 102). Pollock herself
New Formations Number 9 Winter 1989

Reviews

book's weakness; the analysis is burdened with the cumbersome and unwieldy analytic preconceptions of an unreconstructed feminism, and this sometimes blunts some of its sharper insights and political instincts. Having said that, it shouldthat Faludi manages to convey some of the passion and energy that fuelled the earlier ambitions of feminism; she thus provides a reminder that, crude as the truths expressed by social movements are, they havesense this composite project succeeds - certainly it cannot simply be dismissed on the grounds of its unreconstructed feminism, or inattention to historical resonance. But her project is flawed because not only does she bury class
Soundings Issue 14, Spring 2000

What is 'Transversal Politics?

2. Donna Haraway, 'Situated knowledge: The science question in feminism and the privilege of partial perspective', Feminist .Studies 14(3), 1988. 3. See Louis Dumont, Homo HierarchiesJan Pettman, Living in the margins, racism, sexism and feminism in Australia, Allen & Unwin, Sydney 1992, p157. 5. Alison Assiter, Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodernschematic. I have elaborated more on the concept in my article 'Women, ethnicity and empowerment, in Feminism and Psychology, special issue, Shifting identities, shifting racisms, edited by K. Bhavnani and A Phoenix
Soundings Issue 12, Summer 1999

'Young Britain': Introduction

significant political and cultural gap between generations. The politics of Marxism Today, the legacies of libertarian socialism, feminism and Gramsci appear to have made little impact on today's young. Young people are not usingsucceed at school, in Education Today and Tomorrow, Vol 49 Nol Spring 1997, and in Black British Feminism, Heidi Safia Mirza (ed), Routledge, London 1997. 117uncertainties of the 1990s. Young behaviour' women appear to have a greater social confidence. The legacy of feminism has been a transformation in their attitudes and aspirations. In contrast to young women's ambition
Soundings Issue 6, Summer 1997

Men Against Men Again

multiplicities of masculinities rather than emphasising the fixed nature of manhood as Stoltenberg does. This realisation follows feminism's insistence that there are now a variety of feminisms. But Stoltenberg and his colleagues still respondimaginary feminism that is united in its demands. It is a frighteningly prescriptive belief-system with religious undertones. Andrea Dworkin is its high priestess and the language is one of conversion. Stoltenberg has seen throughwith age and class. Some men may perceive themselves as a vanguard out there fighting for feminism, but if other men perceive them as a bunch of puritanical whingers it's hardly going to have
Marxism Today October 1990

The Morals Dilemma

assimilate (if not before time) the elements of new codes of interpersonal behaviour that grew out of feminism and anti-racism, and have developed institutional forms (of which the appointment of equal opportunity officerssocialist code of personal behaviour could avoid drawing much of its general and specific content from feminism. It should also be remembered that feminism's challenge to coercive and violent personal behaviour has been mostacute in what one could call enemy territory: it is in the home itself that feminism has fought hardest and it could be argued had its most intense if not its most extensive purchase
Marxism Today October 1987

BURNING QUESTIONS The novel you always wanted ANGELA COYLE

Zane, a rebel and a feminist, but it is also about us too, about our lives, our feminism, and our attempts to live both as truly as we can. Famous revolutionary women, Kollantai, LuxemburgGoldman have publicly and successfully lived their feminism in ways that seem impossible for us. What this novel importantly tells us is that if we can only do the best we can, in the circumstancesthemselves just as we do. What we have is the women’s movement and a kind of feminism that has created spaces to help us be what we want to be, in a way that
Red Rag Volume 14

WOMEN AND THE NATIONAL FRONT Reclaiming history CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY CULTURAL STUDIES, WOMEN & FASCISM STUDY GROUP

woman’s place’ in the home and with children as natural and dictated by her biology, feminism sees it as political. The feelings and problems of everyday life are capable of being changed: motherhoodbarriers to a serious recognition by the Left of the necessary centrality of feminism in the anti-fascist struggle is the traditional Marxist view that fascism is simply the outcome of a mechanically conceived clashpamphlet provides, our own work would have remained largely speculative. In the sphere of practical politics, feminism has yet to make a real impact on the anti-fascist movement, apart from Women Against Racism
Red Rag Volume 14

UNTITLED ‘78 The Hayward Women’s Show

precision with which it exposes its creator is the source of its magic. ‘Quality’, ‘equality’ but not feminism were the raison d’etre for this show. The catalogue explains that in selec­ ting a showthis is a projection of her own insecurities as is the tentative and obscured nature of her feminism. Sue Beere makes distorted picture frames, which take up floor space as well as wall space. Thisallow their experience as women to intrude into their artistic consciousness. They deny interest or connection to feminism, one exhibitor was heard to say it would be detrimental to her career. And yet their opportunity
Red Rag Volume 14

Who are we? � class and the women�s movement

WOMEN’S MOVEMENT This article asks a number of questions about the relation­ ship of feminism to class in Britain today. The comments which I have offered on these questions are ideas, not answersconscious, organised feminist movement — the one which goes to conferences, produces journals, sets up local groups. Clearly, feminism in Britain has a much broader base than this movement. Equal pay strikes, the abortion, campaign, localcareful analysis of the changes which have been occurring in the relationship of class and feminism
Red Rag Volume 11

Editorial cover

like to try and explain what we mean by this. We are feminist first and foremost because feminism is the political movement which emerges as women’s response to their own oppression. The material basereal power and privilege, that is, their economic, social, cultural, and psychological dominance. Feminism has produced much analysis, in particular of women’s subjective experience of their oppression, its biologicalconsider all aspects of the women’s movement. We are committed to a critical exploration of radical feminism and Marxist feminism to encourage ongoing discussion about the theory and practice of women’s liberation
Red Rag Volume 4

Kinnock's Crusaders

that with a few exceptions, although they've lived their adult lives in the era of feminism - their time, is after all, the time of the women's movement - they seem oddly exiled fromParty of the 80s is the insurgence of the women who, because they have the culture of feminism as a reference point outside the party, challenge the ritualised parameters of Labourism like othersHattersley's economic committee meetings seem to be boys-only affairs. The only room for manoeuvre for feminism in the shadow cabinet is on poverty and social security, not least because Meacher is drawing
Marxism Today October 1985

LABOURING WOMEN - interview with Frances Morrell

Feminism is beginning to make its mark in the Labour Partystruggles of women and blacks? I wouldn't call it the Hobsbawm thesis. My position comes from feminism: that the problem that we've got, as a labour movement, is that women were historically defeatedanti-capitalist or class analysis of society. To return to the Women's Action Committee. Modem feminism very slowly and politely impacted on the Left, and barely impacted on the Right at all. The Labour
Marxism Today April 1985

THELABOUR GOVERNMENTS 1945-51

paperbacks, also specialising in Political South Sciences, Peace, Feminism, E.F.L., Russian and Slavonic books and journals (in Russian and • The Odd Volume, 53 Upper Gloucester English fromRadical Book Road, Brighton (27845). New & second-hand Bargains. Records Department: Classical, in- books on politics, history, feminism, third cluding Melodiya, Folk. Posters and Badges. world, philosophy & literature. Open MonFilm and Media Sectionchester 1 (Off Piccadilly). Feminism, third • Collet's Chinese Bookshop, 40Great Russell world and socialist books (061-236 3112)
Marxism Today July 1984

Crossed Lines: Communists in Search of an Identity

believe the party has followed a revisionist course since 1956, if not before. They deride 'bourgeois feminism' and other social movements; want to abandon the CP's electoral work in order to facilitate enteringwhere a creative Marxism must face up to the challenge of new movements and issues such as feminism, ecology and deindustrialisation. It is true to say that the party has a creditable record hereconsiderable — and painful — deliberations on socialist democracy; the contribution of Marxism Today; and the engagement with feminism represent four notable achievements. However, enormous scope for development exists. Marxism Today suggests that the party
Marxism Today April 1984

Rump or Rebirth?

Up-dated Popular Front The Communist Party was not the subject Feminism of 'Labour's Lost Millions', though its I need say little about contributors who problems are inseparable frompolitics Jan-Feb 1984). As for the question of over five decades' (Norah Carlin and Ian feminism, what was said on the subject in Birchall, 'Kinnock's Favourite Marxist: 'Labour's Lost Millions' can onlylike to important article to which Coote rightly have them', made sense then and still draws attention. (Feminism is Dead? Long makes sense. Live Feminism' Marxism Today Oct 1983). If we thought it could
Marxism Today March 1984

The Gender Trap

At the same time, feminism must be seen as a much more general movement amongst women since the late 1960s. ThisFeminism emphasises the need for women to organise, to learn from and represent themselves, and to develop structuresradical change in men's relationship to work, to parenting and to other family responsibilities. Feminism has greatly increased women's confidence in themselves because it has legitimised women's own experience which differs
Marxism Today February 1984