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Class and Classlessness

only been discussed explicitly by Richard Hoggart in The Uses of Literacy and Conviction and by Stuart Hall in "A Sense of Classlessness" (U.L.R. 5), and it has not yet been related to other kindsstrengthening of the English class system. Finally, I discuss Stuart Hall's description of the working-class communitydevelopment is towards the personalisation of work, through guided participation, excluding ownership, from above." Stuart Hall's image of nineteenth-century capitalism is extrapolated from the descriptive parts of Marx's Capital which describes
Universities & Left Review Spring 1959 issue 6

And Not A Shot Fired

Shot Fired So you think Thatcherism is over. That somehow it belongs to yesteryear. Stuart Hall, the man who coined the phrase, thinks differently. He argues that the revolution is still rollingshops looted and buildings fired. (Tony Lane, Liverpool - City Of Harder Times To Come) Jan 1979: Stuart Hall's 'The Great Moving Right Show' inaugurates MT's pioneering analysis of 'Thatcherism' and sees the firstAn original illustration by Stuart Hall. The author is horizontal and the editor vertical
Marxism Today December 1991

The Marxism Today Story The history of the magazine from 1977-1991

shops looted and buildings fired. (Tony Lane, Liverpool - City Of Harder Times To Come) Jan 1979: Stuart Hall's 'The Great Moving Right Show' inaugurates MT's pioneering analysis of 'Thatcherism' and sees the firstdiscuss its parameters more fully and openly on the Left without inhibition or built-in guarantees. (Stuart Hall, The Great Moving Right Show)eventual outcome of Thatcherism.' (Peter Jenkins, The Guardian, 3.11.1982) Nov 1982: In 'A Long Haul' Stuart Hall analyses the underlying reasons for Labour's crisis. Dec 1982: A long feature appears in the Financial Times
Marxism Today December 1991

Margaret Thatcher And Ruth Ellis

first of what has become a set of key articles on Thatcher's third term, Stuart Hall argued in the July 1987 issue of Marxism Today that the Conservative victory needed to be understoodthat describes fantasy as a projection of individual self-interest (the 'rational' reasons identified by Stuart Hall); but equally the one that sees fantasy as an unbridled irrationalism without any logic, a conception which turnsphrase was used by Hall specifically in response to a question about Wilhelm Reich (p. 72). These articles are just two from a series by Stuart Hall which, together with those by Sarah Benton
New Formations Number 6 Winter 1988

Politics Begins At Home

In the July issue, Stuart Hall and Martin Jacques argued that Bob Geldof and Sport Aid had succeeded where the Left had failed in makingPADDY COULTER By-passing the Left A new popular movement, as Stuart Hall and Martin Jacques rightly detected, has emerged under the unsuspecting nose of the Left. This was evident in lastmovement has given a high priority to Third World issues. But it is equally foolish for Stuart Hall and Martin Jacques to imply there has been no response to recent development issues particularly when
Marxism Today September 1986

Commitment in Politics

material drives of working people. "Capitalism as a social system is now based upon consumption," writes Stuart Hall {A Sense of Classlessness, U.L.R. 5); and, "not only has the working class been built intopart of the very conditions of life and work of the whole people. The ethos which Stuart Hall describes so perceptively, and terms "the status ladder," went by the name, in Victorian England, of "selfsubject to most of the commerciallyinduced pressures towards a "middle-class style of life" which Stuart Hall anatomises; but why do he and others dwell so exclusively on the negative features of the situation
Universities & Left Review Spring 1959 issue 6

Notes on Contributors

Editorial: Uncomfortable Times Stuart Hall, Doreen Massey, Michael RustinStuart Hall Doreen Massey Michael RustinNOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS Stuart Hall is Professor of Sociology at the Open University. Barbara Castle, now Baroness Castle of Blackburn
Soundings Issue 1, Autumn 1995

Redrawing the Political Map

STUART HALLcrisis, which very often we don't do. Peter Jenkins I agree with a lot of what Stuart has said because it seems to me that she has broken the terms of the postwar settlementSam Aaronovitch is the author of The Road from Thatcherism; Stuart Hall is the co-author of Policing the Crisis; Peter Jenkins is political columnist for The Guardian
Marxism Today December 1982

The Commitment To Theory

concern here is with the process of 'intervening ideologically', as Stuart Hall describes the role of 'imaging' or representation in the practice of politics in his response to the British election of 1987.4 For HallThird Cinema or whatever, whose objects of priority - class or sexuality or 'the new ethnicity' (Stuart Hall) - are always in historical and philosophical tension, or cross-reference with other objectives. Indeed, the whole historyprinciple of 'political' articulation. . . . This seems to be the theoretical issue at the heart of Stuart Hall's arguments for the construction of a counter-hegemonic power bloc through which a socialist party might construct
New Formations Number 5 Summer 1988

Black Hair/Style Politics

social status, while European elements are positively valorized as attributes enabling individual upward mobility.6 Stuart Hall in turn emphasizes the composite nature of white bias, which he refers to as the 'ethnic scale', as bothStuart Hall, Paul Gilroy and Clyde Taylor. 1 The Black Voice, 15, 3 (June 1983) (paper of the Black Unity and Freedom Party, London SE15). 2 See Tony Jefferson and Stuart Hall (eds), Resistance throughDent, 1978), 446 Ferdinand Henriques, Family and Colour in Jamaica (London: Seeker & Warburg, 1953), 54-57 Stuart Hall, 'Pluralism, race and class in Caribbean society', in Race and Class in Post-Colonial Society (New York
New Formations Number 3 Winter 1987

In the no man's land

STUART HALL
Universities & Left Review Winter 1958 issue 3

The Vicissitudes Of 'Progressive Television'

Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982). 39 Raymond Williams, Communications (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1976), 131. 40 Cf. Stuart Hall, 'Encoding/decoding', in Stuart Hall et al. (eds), Culture, Media, Language (London: Hutchinson, 1980), 128-38. 41 Cf. Umberto
New Formations Number 2 Summer 1987

Setting Limits To Culture

achievement of this theoretical balancing act lies in the concept of articulation. According to Stuart Hall this concept is the bearer of an important double meaning. First, 'articulate' 'means to utter, to speak forthGrossberg (ed.), 'On postmodernism and articulation: an interview with Stuart Hall', Journal of Communication Inquiry, vol. 10 (1986), 53-5. ibid. ibid. See Stuart Hall, 'The rediscovery of "ideology": return of the repressed in media
New Formations Number 4 Spring 1988

Europe's Other Self

Self The history of Europe is not only internal, but external: its relation with its Others. Stuart Hall examines the impact of fundamentalism and Third World migration on European identityfundamentalist') is one of the products of 'globalisation' - the most subversive of its many unintended consequences. Stuart Hall is professor of sociology at the Open University
Marxism Today August 1991

Parties on the verge of a nervous breakdown

Parties on the verge of a nervous breakdown Stuart Hall Both right and left of British politics are in need of a 'grand idea'. Stuart Hall examines the dangers on both sides of the political
Soundings soundings issue 1 Autumn 1995

Parties on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Parties on the verge of a nervous breakdown Stuart Hall Both right and left of British politics are in need of a 'grand idea'. Stuart Hall examines the dangers on both sides of the political
Soundings Issue 1, Autumn 1995

March Without Vision

March Without Vision Thatcherism is on its last legs. Stuart Hall and Martin Jacques examineStuart Hall and Martin Jacques co-edited New Times (Lawrence and Wishart)
Marxism Today December 1990

Left And Rights

entered the political debate with a vengeance. Mrs Thatcher uses it: so does the Left. Stuart Hall and David Held argueDifferent elements of the argument in this article are elaborated in Stuart Hall, The Voluntary Sector Under Attack (an IVAC publication) and in David Held, Political Theory And The Modern
Marxism Today June 1989

Coming Up For Air

Hall and Ernesto Laclau take
Marxism Today March 1990

A game of two halves

transmission of these accounts and self-narratives in the mainstream media is evidence of what Stuart Hall refers to as 'the margins coming into representation'. It is of course debatable whether there was everIndeed various fractions of this complex dynamic have been explored in some detail by writers including Stuart Hall, Kevin Robins and Kobena Mercer, amongst others. For the purposes of the discussion here, it is importantModern globalisation processes and the decentering of English identity Stuart Hall describes the period when 'the image of a stiff upper-lipped white middle class male' was the central
Soundings soundings issue 10 Autumn 1998

A Game of Two Halves: 'English' identity fifty years after the Windrush

transmission of these accounts and self-narratives in the mainstream media is evidence of what Stuart Hall refers to as 'the margins coming into representation'. It is of course debatable whether there was everIndeed various fractions of this complex dynamic have been explored in some detail by writers including Stuart Hall, Kevin Robins and Kobena Mercer, amongst others. For the purposes of the discussion here, it is importantModern globalisation processes and the decentering of English identity Stuart Hall describes the period when 'the image of a stiff upper-lipped white middle class male' was the central
Soundings Issue 10, Autumn 1997

Narratives Of Nationalism: Being 'British'

Party; considering a politics of everyday life that breaks with the great prospects of 'British masochism' (Stuart Hall) and begins to recognize a politics of sexuality, style, and fashion (Britain's fourth industry) usually raisesdemonstrated that the liberal state was organized to counter mass democracy and universal suffrage'; Stuart Hall and Bill Schwarz, 'State and society, 1880-1930', in Mary Langlan and Bill Schwarz (eds), Crises in the Britishnineteenth and early twentieth centuries, see Bill Schwarz, 'Conservatism, nationalism and imperialism', in James Donald and Stuart Hall (eds), Politics and Ideology (Milton Keynes: Open University Press, 1986). Finally, the recent shift by both radical
New Formations Number 7 Spring 1989

GLC R.I.P: Cultural Policies in London 1981-1986

Black arts policy was given unprecedented backing at members' and officers' level respectively. 'Before the GLC,' Stuart Hall remarks, 'black people in London were just totally outside the whole political mechanism, except tiny groupingsexceeds them all'. 26 Secondly, and very much related to this, is the question identified by Stuart Hall as the 'mobilisation and hegemonisation of a wider left formation, involving people who do not havebridged by the various groups on the libertarian left interested in non-capitalist market forms - what Stuart Hall has called 'artisan capitalism'.28 One example of such groups is Comedia, a publishing house and management
New Formations Number 1 Spring 1987

Notes on Contributors

Stuart Hall Doreen Massey Michael RustinPostscript Stuart HallSean Gray is an economist who has worked in politics and government. Stuart Hall is joint editor of Soundings. Simon Hamilton-Clarke attends Hatch End High School and lives in Harrow with
Soundings Issue 10, Autumn 1997

Faith, Hope or Clarity

Faith, Hope or Clarity Stuart Hall LET ME START by saying that I regard this not as a debate in which one triesStuart Hall and Tony Benn at the Left A live conference, 1984
Marxism Today January 1985