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356 results for feminism

Fuzzy Feminism

Fuzzy Feminism THE paper, ‘Women, the unions and work-or what is not to be done,’ seems to me important because of the kinds of discussion it has provoked, rather than becausefeminism in this paper. Who are we black­ mailing? The men or the capitalists? And even
Red Rag Volume 2

MASS MARKET FEMINISM

MASS MARKET FEMINISM Margaret Tarratt
Marxism Today June 1983

Feminism is Dead? Long Live Feminism

Feminism is Dead? Long Live Feminism SOME SECTIONS OF the Left have always regarded feminism as irrelevantattitudes have been linked to a view that Tory policies constitute an overthrow of any achievements which feminism might have claimed and that support for the Right expressed a reactionary shift in popular attitudes towardsinvoke traditional class interests as the core around which a new socialist consensus can be built. Feminism fell by the wayside first on the Trotskyist Left. At its 1981 conference the Socialist Workers Party disbanded
Marxism Today October 1983

Feminism in 1984 - viewpoint

Feminism is not being ignored by the Left, just marginalised. Below, two responses to the articles by Tricia Davis (October) and Jean Gardiner (February)threat In Tricia Davis' article 'Feminism is Dead? Long live feminism' (MT Oct 83) she examines the credibility of feminism in the current political arena. In Davis' opinion, Tory ideology has ironically embraced manydemands and characteristics of feminism whilst the Left has retreated from them, regarding 'women's oppression as a subsection of class oppression.' In conclusion she puts forward three options. First that the Tory attempt
Marxism Today March 1984

Psychoanalysis & Feminism - a review

Psychoanalysis and Feminism Ros Delmar Hostility to Freud has been a part of the conventional ideas of the women’s movement. Many of us received our first interpretationswork through the outraged polemics of American feminism. Natalie Shainess summarised a typ­ ical approach: ‘He considered women defective, since born without a penis, and felt that motherhood was a compensa­ tion for this deficiencydebate has been marked by the publication last year of Juliet Mitchell’s book, Psychoanalysis and Feminism
Red Rag Volume 8

Consciousness, class and feminism

CONSCIOUSNESS CLASS, AND FEMINISM Sarah Benton Pictures by Hackney Flashers If you sell your labour power, then you are a worker. If you know that you are getting paid for selling your labour power
Red Rag Volume 12

The Forward Face of Feminism

Feminism Hilary Wainwright, in her introduction to the new edition of Beyond the Fragments, begins by pointing to the Left's failurequestion of alliances is actually quite central to the book and, in fact, to socialist feminism. For, contrary to popular mythology which we encounter both on the Left and within the WLM itself, socialist feministsevery sentence, nor, by definition at least, women who go to twice as many meetings. Rather socialist feminism is an attempt to define socialism in relation to feminism and vica versa and to hold
Marxism Today October 1980

The Forward Face of Feminism

The Forward Face of Feminism Jill Brown, Pamela Trevithick, Carol Metters The following contribution is the result of discussions between three feminists in Bristol, two of whom are in the Communist Party. Firstlylike to say that we welcomed Tricia Davis and Cath Hall's article 'The Forward Face of Feminism' (Marxism Today, October 1980) in its seriously committed attempt to examine the present state of feminismdiscussion of the different objectives to believe that Fightback is neither static nor of socialism and feminism and the need to inflexible. Fightback, to us, represents a negotiate and renegotiate the connections potential for alliances
Marxism Today January 1981

The Forward Face of Feminism

The Forward Face of Feminism Hilary Wainwright Though Tricia Davis and Cath Hall have some criticisms of Beyond the Fragments, they and we agree on a central point: the need
Marxism Today December 1980

Feminism and the Alternative Economic Strategy

Feminism and the Alternative Economic Strategy
Marxism Today October 1981

Does sex have a history? 'Women' and feminism

Denise Riley DOES A SEX HAVE A HISTORY? 'WOMEN' AND FEMINISMfluctuating identity?' For both concentration on and refusal of the identity of 'women' are essential to feminism. This its history makes plain. FEMINISM AND THE IDENTITY OF ' W O M E N 'sidestep these arguments in order to move to the ground of historical construction, including the history of feminism itself, and suggest that not only 'woman' but also 'women' is troublesome, and that this extension
New Formations Number 1 Spring 1987

Colluding in the backlash? Feminism and the construction of 'orthodoxy'

Colluding in the backlash? Feminism and the construction of 'orthodoxy' Rosalind Gill Rosalind Gill argues that to talk of feminism as an orthodoxy is to play intothis year, Ros Coward wrote an article for The Guardian which enraged other feminists.1 She argued that feminism was responsible for putting a 'gag' on debates about fatherhood, with the suggestion that even raisingCoward's argument, and to explore some of the political implications of her characterisation of feminism as a rigid orthodoxy which permits no dissent. Beatrix Campbell picked up on this in her reply
Soundings soundings issue 5 Spring 1997

Colluding in the Backlash? Feminism and the Construction of 'Orthodoxy?

Colluding in the backlash? Feminism and the construction of 'orthodoxy' Rosalind Gill Rosalind Gill argues that to talk of feminism as an orthodoxy is to play intothis year, Ros Coward wrote an article for The Guardian which enraged other feminists.1 She argued that feminism was responsible for putting a 'gag' on debates about fatherhood, with the suggestion that even raisingCoward's argument, and to explore some of the political implications of her characterisation of feminism as a rigid orthodoxy which permits no dissent. Beatrix Campbell picked up on this in her reply
Soundings Issue 5, Spring 1997

The Judgement Of Paris (And The Choice Of Kristeva): French Theory And Feminism This Side Of The Channel

THE JUDGEMENT OF PARIS (AND THE CHOICE OF KRISTEVA) FRENCH THEORY AND FEMINISM THIS SIDE OF THE CHANNELsupport for the feminist slogan 'the personal is political', but also to offer a framework in which feminism appeared not just as a liberation movement on a par with others, but as the onlyoppression of actual women, as far too general and removed from the specificities of social problems. Feminism too found in French theory both the catalyst, the missing ingredient that would complete it, and a potential
New Formations Number 9 Winter 1989

How Men Are: Speaking Of Masculinity

Sexuality of Men, London, Pluto, 1983; 194 pp; £4.50. Alice Jardine and Paul Smith, Men in Feminism, London and New York, Methuen, 1987; 288 pp; £7.95Emmanuel Reynaud, Holy Virility: the social construction of masculinitylate 1980s a young pop musician, aged 24, who is positively responsive to post-1968 feminism, has taken it upon himself to sing a song on a 'woman's themethat time, men were beginning in pop to show some awareness of the widening influence of feminism, and pop itself was developing - mostly through the post-punk success of indie labels - a marginal interest
New Formations Number 6 Winter 1988

Sisters And Slogans

Sisters T And Slogans Whatever happened to socialist feminism? Melissa Benn argues that it hasn't yet clocked the fact that feminism in the 80s is rather different from feminism in the 70spublished by well-known socialist feminists: Lynne Segal's Is the Future Female?: Troubled Thoughts on Contemporary Feminism, and Anne Phillips' Divided Loyalties: Dilemmas of Sex and Class. Although the books, and particularly Lynne Segalaround the issues raised in the books, and particularly the troubled question: what has happened to socialist feminism in the 1980s? Reviews have mostly been calm and descriptive, written in the same sad but wise
Marxism Today April 1987

Experiences of strangeness

Feminisms old and new Alyson Pendlebury Natasha Walter (ed), On the Move: Feminism for a New Generation, Virago Natasha Walter, The New Feminism Virago Germaine Greer, the whole woman, DoubledayMove, edited by Natasha Walter, is a collection of essays and interviews which considers what feminism means to women in the late 1990s. The contributors come from a variety of backgrounds; some are teenagersconsidered themselves feminists, but disliked the 'radical lesbian' image which they associate with feminism. They preferred to define feminism on their own terms, as the pursuit of equality for women, both at home
Soundings soundings issue 13 Autumn 1999

Reviews

Feminisms old and new Alyson Pendlebury Natasha Walter (ed), On the Move: Feminism for a New Generation, Virago Natasha Walter, The New Feminism Virago Germaine Greer, the whole woman, DoubledayMove, edited by Natasha Walter, is a collection of essays and interviews which considers what feminism means to women in the late 1990s. The contributors come from a variety of backgrounds; some are teenagersconsidered themselves feminists, but disliked the 'radical lesbian' image which they associate with feminism. They preferred to define feminism on their own terms, as the pursuit of equality for women, both at home
Soundings Issue 13, Autumn 1999

Sisters Under The Skin

Sisters Under The S k i n Has feminism gone soft? Or disappeared altogether? Rosalind Coward and Sarah Mower launch ourfeminism into the 1990scase that women's social position has not hugely improved, has feminism failed to speak to that tension and conflict? And will it do so in the 90s? One factor which has subverted feminism
Marxism Today February 1990

Macho Men Of The Left

Macho Men Of The Left Feminism continues to stalk socialism. Gender remains an unresolved tension on the LeftWhat is thrown in question by such thoughts is the viability of socialist feminism. In some countries of Europe one finds few women today who will describe themselves as socialistfeministsmarxistfeminists. This is not because such women are liberal, bourgeois or rightwards-inclined. Far from it. Feminism in Greece and Spain, for example, was born as part of the anti-fascist struggle and it retains
Marxism Today April 1988

Sweets from a Stranger

past few years, a crisis which seems to have shifted into a new energy and confidence in feminism’s innovations. The implications for revolutionary theory of organisation. In that sense these notes are pursuingPolitical separation was and is a necessary condition for the production of feminism as politics. (Many socialists found this really difficult. Spatial separa­ tion was threatening, not, however, just because1. Contemporary feminism restores the sexual contradiction as a central problematic for revolutionary theory (though you’d not know
Red Rag Volume 13

Pecs and penises: the meaning of girlie culture

More! magazine, images of confident and sexually assertive young women proliferate across the media. Is this new feminism? Or simply new fun ? In February 1996 Tory MP Peter Luff presented a Private Member's BillMore! were also allfemale. They too spoke in the language of what is now called 'popular feminism'. Female assertiveness, being in control and enjoying sex, are now recognised as entitlements, and the struggle for equalityencouragement of their daughters and by younger women in the community. To these young women official feminism is something that belongs to their mothers' generation. They have to develop their own language for dealing with
Soundings soundings issue 5 Spring 1997

An impossible heroine? Mary Wollstonecraft and female heroism

The history of feminism provides an apt beginning-point for an exploration of these issues. After all, where is one likelierpoint where the women's rights movement invented itself as a tradition, naming itself as feminism and constructing its own historical trajectory. The first histories of English feminism, published at the beginning of the twentiethmany fin-desiecle women who found in Wollstonecraft the ideal heroine - a prototype New Woman - for feminism's heroic age
Soundings soundings issue 3 Summer 1996

'Pecs and Penises': The Meaning of Girlie Culture

More! magazine, images of confident and sexually assertive young women proliferate across the media. Is this new feminism? Or simply new fun ? In February 1996 Tory MP Peter Luff presented a Private Member's BillMore! were also allfemale. They too spoke in the language of what is now called 'popular feminism'. Female assertiveness, being in control and enjoying sex, are now recognised as entitlements, and the struggle for equalityencouragement of their daughters and by younger women in the community. To these young women official feminism is something that belongs to their mothers' generation. They have to develop their own language for dealing with
Soundings Issue 5, Spring 1997

An Impossible Heroine? Mary Wollstonecraft and female heroism

The history of feminism provides an apt beginning-point for an exploration of these issues. After all, where is one likelierpoint where the women's rights movement invented itself as a tradition, naming itself as feminism and constructing its own historical trajectory. The first histories of English feminism, published at the beginning of the twentiethmany fin-desiecle women who found in Wollstonecraft the ideal heroine - a prototype New Woman - for feminism's heroic age
Soundings Issue 3, Summer 1996