Search

Example searches: feminism black power stuart hall
Example searches: feminism black power stuart hall

185 results for stuart hall

Heroes, Heroines: Introduction – Who dares, fails

They know the doubleness, the ambivalence, which is at the heart of identification: how slippery the distinction is between 'being' and 'having'; how little role modelling has to do with someone else's actual life, and how much it has to do with our rewriting of that life, into our narratives, with autography; how little it tells us about them, 117 soundings how much about our desire, both for ourselves and for the other; how inextricably the merging in fantasy with is linked to the awakening of the violence of refusal and rejection from - real or imagined. Bevan - my hero from the days of the suez demonstration in trafalgar square in 1956, when he had put the pigeons to flight with his scathing denunciation of the nefarious eden-french-israeli stitch-up that had taken britain into the most ludicrous post-imperial adventurism until the falklands war - had responded to this triumph of cnd campaigning, 'don't send me naked into the conference chamber'.
Soundings Issue 3, Summer 1996

I Want The Black One: Is There A Place For Afro-American Culture In Commodity Culture?

opens up the commodity form, but does it provide a platform for the emergence of what Stuart Hall calls the 'concrete historical subject'?38 Is there a Meridian in this text, capable of discovering
New Formations Number 10 Spring 1990

A Symptomology Of An Authoritarian Discourse: The Parliamentary Debates On The Prohibition Of The Promotion Of Homosexuality

play of racial and sexual images in this poster was by no means incidental; as Stuart Hall notes, the construction of the equivalence, Labour = 'excessive' local government = high rates = 'loony Left' = permissiveness = radical blackness, gayness
New Formations Number 10 Spring 1990

Identities

reassess the dynamic between the dissemination of identities and their fixity. T h u s Stuart Hall has recently been arguing for what he calls a 'new ethnicity': a politics that acknowledges the cultural construction
New Formations Number 5 Summer 1988

Englishness And The Paradox Of Modernity

well as others (e.g. Stuart Hall and Enoch Powell) believe that it is within the shadow of that period, and its meanings, that
New Formations Number 1 Spring 1987

Reviews

STUART HALL
Universities & Left Review Summer 1957 vol 1 no 2

Room at the Top

sense of the object of riches being transformed into the personal ambitions of the hero, which Stuart Hall wrote about in "A Sense of Classlessness" (ULR 5). But Mr. Gibbs does not follow his point
Universities & Left Review Spring 1959 issue 6

New Authoritarianism-New Left

Murdoch — their principal themes ("the new classlessness" and " alienation") are discussed elsewhere in this issue by Stuart Hall and Charles Taylor. Theirs is above all a plea for renewing the tradition of moral seriousness
Universities & Left Review Autumn 1958 issue 5

Alienation and Community

provide the only criterion of success. (This represents, in fact, the growth of " Consumer Capitalism," which Stuart Hall analyses at length in his article in this issue.)
Universities & Left Review Autumn 1958 issue 5

A Commitment Dialogue

part were: Graham Martin, Alan Lovell, Maurice Butterworth, Paddy Whannel, Charles Taylor, Gary Pearson, Alex Jacobs, Stuart Hall. {The two poems discussed in detail were "Song To a Dead Soldier"—New Reasoner
Universities & Left Review Summer 1958 issue 4

...

basis of a series of discussions. The unsigned material has been written up by Stuart Hall, Ralph Samuel, Peter Sedgwick, Charles Taylor. Clive Jenkins' article is based on material for his forthcoming study
Universities & Left Review Winter 1958 issue 3

The New Labour Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

formulated this as 'corporate populism', which gives an apt new emphasis to the concept which Stuart Hall earlier devised in regard to Thatcherism, 'authoritarian populism'. In a valid contrast, Barnett juxtaposes the manipulative and authoritarian
Soundings Issue 14, Spring 2000

Notes on Contributors

Stuart Hall Doreen Massey Michael Rustin
Soundings Issue 14, Spring 2000

This Sporting Nation

which is marked by the contestory work of such critics as C.L.R. James and Stuart Hall. Of course there’s Black in the Union Jack This narrative of elective assimilation does prepare the viewer
Soundings Issue 13, Autumn 1999

Tony Blair and the Jargon of Modernisation

point for analyses of Thatcherism developed by important writers such as Andrew Gamble and Stuart Hall. In particular, modernisation formed an underlying theme to the perspectives developed in the 1980s in the pages of Marxism
Soundings Issue 10, Autumn 1997

Active Welfare: Introduction – Across the Great Divide

these essays help transcend the traditional 'agency-structure' dichotomy in our theorisation of social welfare. As Stuart Hall observed recently, 'You can no longer think primarily in terms of the economic and the material
Soundings Issue 8, Spring 1998

Writing the Obituaries: Interview with Patrick Wright

amazement, I discovered that, with the exception of Gramsci (then being re-read by Stuart Hall and others), the Marxist tradition - the left intellectual tradition - hardly recognised nationalism except as a third-world development stratagem
Soundings Issue 8, Spring 1998

Notes on Contributors

Stuart Hall Doreen Massey Michael Rustin
Soundings Issue 8, Spring 1998

Reimagining the Inhuman City: The 'Pure Genius' Land Occupation

Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic, Verso, London 1993. The introduction to Stuart Hall's Hard Road to Renewal, Verso, London 1988, has a fine discussion of Thatcherism's relation
Soundings Issue 7, Autumn 1997

The Break-up of the Conservative Nation

Conservatism was based not merely on the tinkerings of electoral calculus. They were going, as Stuart Hall argued, for a radical recasting of the conservative nation. Time and again they declared that theirs
Soundings Issue 7, Autumn 1997

Editorial: Questions Which Remain

what labour must be calculating - for it is what we all believe - is that there has been a significant shift in the popular political mood; and that this is a shift - not of very extensive proportions, perhaps, for ordinary voters, but politically significant nonetheless - against the worst excesses of the neo-liberal revolution: and specifically against its rampant individualism, its profound selfishness, against 'the only thing that matters is to look after number one'; against the philosophy that 'there is no such thing as society, there is only the individual and his (sic) family'; in rejection of the belief that market forces are the only criterion of social value and should be 'free' of all limit and regulation, to drive blindly and ruthlessly through society, destroying the social fabric and the bonds of reciprocity between people and the devil take the hindmost. Or that chris woodhead, who has made himself the chief apologist for and instrument of tory education 'reform', and whose continuity in office labour has just confirmed, really is the best and the only person to see a radical shift from the present drift to selection through to a successful completion? of course, moving people from the dole queue to jobs will gradually reduce the swollen social security budget but, apart from 'training', new labour has no substantive economic strategy to create jobs and seems no longer to believe that it is government's task to have one.
Soundings Issue 5, Spring 1997

Welfare Settlements and Racialising Practices

all.12 11. B. Tizard and A. Phoenix, 1993, Black, White or Mixed Race, London:Routledge. 12. Stuart Hall, 'New Ethnicities', reprinted in J. Donald and A. Rattansi, 'Race', Culture and Difference, Sage, London 1992, p257
Soundings Issue 4, Autumn 1996

Politics and Civil Society In the Wake of the New Right

their different ways, thinkers like Edward Thompson, Raymond Williams, Juliet Mitchell, Perry Anderson, Tom Nairn and Stuart Hall never lost sight of the particular significance of the power exercised within the state, and its interactions
Soundings Issue 4, Autumn 1996

After the Deluge:

their different ways, thinkers like Edward Thompson, Raymond Williams, Juliet Mitchell, Perry Anderson, Tom Nairn and Stuart Hall never lost sight of the particular significance of the power exercised within the state, and its interactions
Soundings Issue 4, Autumn 1996

Notes on Contributors

Stuart Hall Doreen Massey Michael Rustin
Soundings Issue 4, Autumn 1996